Kyle’s Mea Culpa

Readers of Gentle Reformation,

With the fear that this may be read as a bit of shameless self-promotion I want to respond to some criticism I have received over a previous article: “Tebow’s Mea ‘Culpo.'” That criticism has focused on two things I wrote in the article and has been offered with varying degrees of charity. The first was a concern over my comment regarding the Lord’s Day. A second concern, and the one that is the incentive for what I now write, has to do with the historical accuracy of news reports relating to Tim Tebow’s relationship with Olivia Culpo. A widely cited article originally appearing on TMZ claims that the two met at church, hung out with a group of friends, and were never involved in a relationship. As a result, a few have suggested to me that some of the critique I offered was not in accord with the facts.

First, let me offer thanks to those of you motivated by the noble desire for truth who graciously contacted me. I think it was John Owen who once said something to the effect that those who write subject themselves to the gauntlet and they must be content to bear it. By the way, I have no citation for that and if you can find one I’d be in your debt. Second, let me reiterate that my desire was never to add to the juicy gossip and slander. Of late I have been studying what the book of Proverbs says in relation to the mouth–both its worthy and unworthy use–and it is my sincere hope that my words (spoken or written) would offer grace to those who hear (Ephesians 4:29). If I have sinned I have done so unintentionally. Third, this has brought to my attention the difficulty of balancing news media with our Christian obligations. Here provocative questions abound! What is the relationship between a Christian and the news? How do we discern the accuracy and inaccuracy of that which is being reported? Must we, as the proverbial saying goes, always hear all things from the horses’ mouth (or, in this case the Bronco’s)? At the original time of writing I was offering commentary on what I thought to be accurate reporting from multiple news sources (some more trustworthy than others). Perhaps I should have exercised more discreetness and aimed to be more responsive than reactionary–for that I apologize. Finally, while the said events might be somewhat questionable, I hope the ambiguity of the facts doesn’t steal away from my intent. I meant it when I said I was writing as a pastor. Confused as I am why Tim Tebow has become the public face of Christianity to many, my concern isn’t personally with him. It’s with the many Christians–some of whom I have been personally involved–who are in relationships that are not at all harmonious with the will of God; or who have reduced the biblical requirement of such relationships to merely one of abstinence; or who, because of worldly attachments, struggle to be a disciple of Jesus Christ; or who are caught in the web of sexual immorality. If the fuzzy example of Tim Tebow did not serve but rather obscured that end then I humbly apologize.

I guess in my own way–ironic as it might be–this is my own mea culpa!

Striving to Boast in Christ With You All,

Kyle

4 Comments

  1. Maria Tatham December 3, 2015 at 8:52 pm #

    God bless you, Kyle!

    • Kyle Borg December 3, 2015 at 9:01 pm #

      You too, Maria!

  2. blund December 7, 2015 at 1:22 pm #

    With all due respect, I do not accept your apology. Your comments about the Lord’s Day and football are appropriate and accurate. Secondly, reported news may be inaccurate or ill-gotten, yet it is the public record and Christians are not sullied for interacting with it. Therefore, your well-meant apology is unaccepted. Thanks.

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  1. Tebow’s Mea “Culpo” | Gentle Reformation - December 3, 2015

    […] (EDIT: Due to feedback I have received on this article I have posted a follow up here: Kyle’s Mea Culpa). […]

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