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Don’t waste your suffering #5

A Promise to Cling to

A series of four articles on suffering is all very well, but when you’re in the thick of it sometimes all you can do is cling to a single verse or a phrase.

This is the story of my verse.

I want to start off with an odd question: What is the least consequential, unnecessary thing, that God has done for you that has brought a smile to your face and a thank-you to your lips?

I think of a long journey home from somewhere and I had a notion for chips (‘fries’ for American readers, expect better 🙂 ). You know how it is when you get a notion, not only do you have to get them, but they need to be good—there are few things as disappointing (at this level) than ropey chips. And so we pulled in at the next chippie. The signs weren’t good—an empty car-park on a Saturday evening, no queue. But we persisted, and a few moments later Judith emerged with the goods. And boy, were they good. On the big scale of life—utterly inconsequential; but on the small scale—”Thank you God for great chips”.

Get your own ‘chip moment’ and hold it in […]

Don’t waste your Suffering #4

So far we have seen two things that will exacerbate our suffering. First of all there is a deficient trust—when we are not looking enough at God. Second is a misplaced trust—when we are looking too much at other things; our plans matter more to us than God.

Third is loss of purpose—when we aren’t looking for anything at all.

Suffering waster #3: Loss of Purpose – Not looking for anything
The two ‘Whys’

When we find ourselves in difficulty it is easy to ask ‘Why’—Why me? Why is this happening to me? What is God doing? What’s the point of this?

Easy to ask, but much harder to answer; even harder when someone else is doing the asking. And from one angle we have to say that we don’t know why.

There are two types of answers to ‘why’ questions. There is the fine tuned answer which God alone knows. Sometimes we see little glimpses of what God is doing, occasionally in the midst, often later, when we see some of the purpose in our suffering. But what if we can’t see anything like that?

There is another set of answers to the ‘why’ questions. They are the broad-brush answers.

These broad-brush answers give us a sense […]

Don’t waste your suffering #3

Picture two avid sportsmen. Both Christians. Both sustain a career threatening injury. One is sorry that his playing days are over, he’ll miss game, it will be some time before he will even watch it on TV. The other is devastated, can’t see how God would allow this, and descends into a deep depression.

What makes the difference? Undoubtedly our psyches are different; some are phlegmatic taking life as it comes, others fiery and passionate. Looking at our previous two articles, the issue could be: Do they trust God enough with their future?

But I believe there is another factor that can make a difference, intensifying the suffering.

Suffering Waster #2: Idolatry – Looking too much at other things

Idolatry—it’s not a pleasant concept. Bold, stark, ugly. And perhaps you think, “Surely not amongst Christians”. If deficient trust is not looking enough at God, then idolatry is the problem of looking too much to other things.

It was the great Old Testament problem for the people of God, rippling through from Eden, to Sinai, to the Promised Land, to the exile, and John is still warning his readers at the end of the New Testament, “Dear children, keep yourselves from idols” (1 John 5:21).

It lies […]

Don’t Waste Your Suffering #2

Last time we started looking at the things which waste our suffering. Top of the list is a deficient trust in God. If our faith is weak, misplaced, or unfuelled we will struggle all the more when suffering hits.

So before moving on to the second ‘suffering waster’ let’s look at specific ways to bolster our faith.

Bolstering our Faith

If should be fairly clear what the general principles are that will strengthen our faith, but let me make four specific applications;

a)    Know your God

We exacerbate our suffering when we are too focused on life and not enough on God—therefore we need to redress the balance.

What are you reading in your Bible reading?

If you aren’t suffering make sure you supplement your diet with long gazes at the cross, and at the greatness of God—camp out in the Passion narratives at least once a year, delve into Isaiah 40 & 53, Romans 8, Psalm 103, Ephesians 1 & 2, and many more of those great passages (even work at memorising one of them—far easier done before suffering hits). Another good place to explore is the book of Exodus. Watch God’s suffering people, watch how God deals with them, and above all watch the wisdom and character of God.

If […]

Don’t waste your suffering #1

“If you live long enough you will suffer. The only alternative to not suffering is not living long enough”—with those cheering words Don Carson starts an address on suffering. He’s right; suffering is an inevitable part of life, and yet we can be taken aback when it happens, ambushed and left reeling almost as much by the surprise as by the pain.

As a famous rugby player once said, “Get your retaliation in first”!—I want to take a few articles to equip us for when suffering comes. I don’t intend to deal with the questions of why suffering exists and how could God allow it. Suffering does exist, God does allow it, we have to face it.

The real question is “Will it destroy, damage or deepen our faith?” I want to look at how we can inadvertently exacerbate our suffering, how we can be prepared for it, how we can cope better with it and even grow as God intends in it.

In some ways these articles are addressed to people who aren’t suffering yet in order to prepare you to suffer. You need to lay the foundations now for when suffering arrives. You need to take truths and ingrain them into your personality, […]

Countering the Happiness Project

The Indian state of Madhya Pradesh is to create a new government ministry—the country’s first ministry of happiness. It will be dedicated to “putting a smile on every face”. It also aims to track their smiling citizens’ growth in happiness.

The state’s chief minister, Shivraj Singh Chouhan, said, “The state will be made responsible for happiness and tolerance of its citizens and will rope in psychologists to counsel people on how to be always happy.”

The reason this caught my eye was that I was preparing to preach this Sabbath on “Blessed are those who mourn, for they shall be comforted”—so happiness had been uppermost in my contemplations this week. I had also been listening to a lecture Carl Trueman gave at our Shaftesbury Square congregation—and he unpacked a further level of significance to the quest for happiness.

Without being overdramatic I believe the pursuit of happiness (or The Great Happiness Project) lies at the root of many of society’s problems—both personal and social. Obviously I have no problem with happiness—I’m all for it—but the pursuit of it is the problem.

Trueman quotes American sociologist Philip Rieff who set out four stages of Western civilization:

‘Political Man’ of classical civilisation—man defined by the city and […]

Jesus’ Tears – No. 3

The hour is late. Christ has left Jerusalem with his disciples. They leave the warmth of the house and make their way out into the cold night, down into the Kidron valley and start to ascend the Mount of Olives. At its foot lies a small grove of olive trees with a press for crushing the olives. Gethsemane was a peaceful place where Jesus had spent time in prayer.

Jesus takes Peter, James and John with him into the garden. He begins to pray and soon his face is marked once more with tears. Why is he weeping? In these tears Jesus displays for us the agony he went through to win our salvation.

And these perhaps are the most precious tears, because in these tears we see what we have been spared from. We see the depths of Jesus’ love for us, and we see the awful price he paid that we might be forgiven. What do these tears tells us?

These tears speak of the intense sorrow Jesus felt

This sorrow is unusually real and deep. He was overwhelmed to the point of death, surrounded by grief and drowning in pain. Mark in his account says Jesus was “greatly distressed.” This word […]

The Weeds of Sin and the Fruit of the Spirit

I was thinking about the fruit of the Spirit recently and engaged in a bit of reverse engineering, or reverse gardening—to coin a concept. In other words I took the fruit of the Spirit and sought to ask what are the corresponding weeds.

And bearing in mind what my brother in Christ, Andrew Kerr, said last week in his post on sin—in point 12:

“The faithful Gospel minister will be prayerful and careful to deal with ‘respectable sins’ instead of always hitting ‘home runs’”

I thought it would be beneficial to not just nail the weeds of the world, but the respectable Christian versions of those weeds too.

I’m reasonably ok at spotting weeds in the garden when it comes to the usual suspects, but there are a few that look pretty, and have been left to establish a foothold where they should have been rooted out. Likewise with Christian weeds—these respectable sins.

There’s another category: Have you ever been conned by plastic fruit sitting in a bowl? It looks the part, but isn’t the real thing. Christians can have artificial fruit too—it looks the part, but isn’t the work of the Spirit, and brings no joy. What does this artificial fruit look like?

So here’s […]

Jesus’ Tears – No. 2

Tears are like a window to the heart.   They show our deepest emotions. In Luke 19:41 we find the second occasion of Jesus weeping, this time over the city of Jerusalem. Why?

I want to paint two pictures. The first is found in Luke 19:28-38.

Jesus is approaching Jerusalem for the last time. It’s a sunny afternoon. Jesus rides on a donkey, at the centre of a great crowd. People from Bethany have accompanied him, shouting excitedly. They have watched him raise Lazarus from the dead. News has spread to Jerusalem, and people have thronged out of the city to see him, to sing his praises. Palm branches are being waved, people are throwing their cloaks down on the ground for the donkey to walk on. Slowly the donkey makes its way through the crowd. There is a majesty about the moment – like a royal procession. See the colours of the robes, the flashes of the afternoon sun, the vibrant green of the palm branches. Hear the excited, delirious, triumphant shouts of the welcoming crowd. Smiling, happy faces, full of hope and life and joy.

As he moves through this great crowd of welcoming people he comes to the brow of the […]

Christian Fiction—does it help or hinder great faith?

Three thoughts converged in a mellow mood…

Strand one found me talking with someone who runs a Christian bookshop. She commented that so many Christians aren’t familiar with the great missionary biographies that Christians of a previous generation were—the stories of Corrie ten Boom, Jim Elliot, Hudson Taylor, James Fraser, Amy Carmichael, John Paton, etc. Of course every generation needs its new heroes in a sense, but as she saw it, there was a general lack of reading biography.

Strand two came via email alerts of discounted Christian ebooks. Sometimes there are bargains on great books—but I’ve been surprised at the vast amount of Christian fiction out there. The genre isn’t new to me, but seeing wave after wave of titles is.

Strand three came while I was working on a sermon on Nehemiah 2 about daring faith, and was pondering why we see so little by way of daring faith—people engaged in what missionary David Sitton calls ‘Reckless Abandon‘, and what David Platt calls ‘radical Christian living’.

For me, one of the great catalysts to faith-filled living is the reading of the faith-filled lives of God’s people in the past—i.e. Christian biography. And so three strands converged…

Now I’m not going to hang the […]