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Archive | Biography

The Pursuit of Holiness: On the Passing into Glory of Jerry Bridges

When I was converted by Christ at the University of Michigan in the early 1980’s, the Lord used the ministry of The Navigators as his tool to open my mind and heart to Jesus. Within the early months of my new life, my mentor gave me a book that became the first one I read as a new believer. That book was The Pursuit of Holiness by Jerry Bridges.

What a treasure of a book! What a way to begin my Christian journey! I learned at the very beginning of my Christian life that I was responsible now, in the grace of Christ, to be holy before the Lord.  Yet what a battle that would be. As Bridges explained so clearly:

As we grow in holiness, we grow in hatred of sin; and God, being infinitely holy, has an infinite hatred of sin.”

The clear Bible teaching, sound doctrine that I later learned was based on Bridges’ love of the Puritans, and eye-opening illustrations such as “even our tears of repentance need to be washed in the blood of the Lamb” resounded in my newly regenerated heart. The Pursuit of Holiness helped set me properly upon the paths of righteousness on which the Good Shepherd leads all who follow […]

Though Dead He Still Speaks–C.H.S

Hanging on my wall just to the left of my desk is a small framed sheet of paper. The fragile paper is the palette upon which in faded purple ink are scribbled the almost unintelligible handwritten notes of a sermon entitled, “The Joyous Return.” Everything about it bears the marks of age. And rightly so! For the sermon was preached on March 1, 1891 at the Metropolitan Tabernacle in London by the Baptist preacher Charles Spurgeon. The name and influence of Spurgeon has attained near ubiquity among contemporary preachers and students of preaching—and that’s to say nothing of the impact he has had on thousands who have read his sermons. It’s probably not advisable to try and quantify who is or is not the greatest preacher, but I don’t think it’s overly ambitious to agree with the consensus of many that he remains the Prince of Preachers.

It was a little over ten years ago that I was first introduced to Charles Spurgeon. At a very pivotal and difficult time in my life my brother recommended that I try reading some of his sermons. I quickly began to devour them as I read under the conviction of sin, the joy of […]

In Appreciation of C.S. Lewis

Yesterday was the fifty-second anniversary of the death of C.S. Lewis. Though his death was eclipsed by the assassination of John F. Kennedy on the same day, his legacy has endured. While half a century has passed, in the minds of many he remains one of the most successful and influential Christian thinkers of the twentieth century. Personally, I am very thankful for the man and his writings. That may sound strange to some. After all, I have my differences. I’m Presbyterian and he was Anglican. I’m a Calvinist, he wasn’t. I think Christ’s atonement is central, in his impatience he was ambiguous. I believe in the full authority of the Bible, he did not. But despite these and other differences—which are significant—his writings have had a profound effect on me.

C.S. Lewis taught me that Christianity doesn’t have to be mindless. I grew up in the heart of broad-evangelicalism. It was the kind, you might say, that didn’t encourage serious reflection and thought. To put it candidly it was a fairly brainless Christianity. That changed when I first encountered the mind of Lewis in Mere Christianity. Though I’ve moved beyond that book in many ways, it was there I first […]