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3GT Episode 53: Plants & Pillars

In this episode, 3GT becomes 3DT – Three Dads Theologizing!

For Aaron read Psalm 144 and, boy, is he full of questions! First, he wants to know why daughters are described as palace pillars and sons as productive plants in Psalm 144. Then he wants to know how to raise them this way. Then he wants to know whether this description speaks to gender issues. Then he really wants to know how to see the blessing of this psalm in his children’s lives. Simply put, Aaron wants to know!

Do you? Then listen along as the 3DTers meditate together on this psalm!

https://threeguystheologizing.files.wordpress.com/2017/08/3gt-episode-53.mp3

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The Half-Way Covenant & Whole-Hearted Youth Ministry

Baptists and Presbyterians can agree regarding one application of child baptism in church history. What was known as the Half-way Covenant was a bad idea. Yet from it we can gain a valuable lesson regarding the church’s gospel duty to young people.

Jonathan Edwards was the pastor during colonial America to the Congregational church in Northampton, Massachusetts. His preaching in the mid-1700’s was one of the means God used to create the Great Awakening, where multitudes of people turned to the Lord. Yet in the midst of this great fruitfulness, a difficulty arose prompted by a practice in the church established by Edwards’ grandfather, Solomon Stoddard, who preceded Edwards as the minister in Northampton.

Children had been baptized in the Northampton congregation, grown up, and had not clearly professed Christ. Yet their names were left on the roll as baptized members. Then they began to have children. Stodddard, in the hope of influencing this later generation with the gospel, allowed the grandchildren of believing members to be baptized. In response, since church membership at the time was socially desirable, many parents who did not have saving faith in Christ readily agreed to have their children baptized. This Half-way Covenant, as it came […]

Fallen Towers, Risen Savior

Another September 11th has passed, a date of national and global significance ever since the terrifying events which darkened that bright morning back in 2001.  Sadly and predictably, as the years have gone by, many of us are having a harder time remembering that day in a way that honors its significance, despite our heart-felt promises to “never forget.”  More and more, the day has become a sadly but briefly recalled fact of history, and with each anniversary, we’re dedicating fewer and fewer moments to a fading, wistful contemplation of where we were and what we were doing the morning it felt like the sky was not only falling on us, but attacking us.  But for people who had friends or family right there in the midst of the blood and fire of that nightmare of a day, the memories stay fresh and vital. Every September 11th anniversary makes that day in 2001 feel like it was yesterday.  They are the ones who are keeping the promise to never forget.  We should learn from their example.  

An Abundance of Counselors

In an abundance of counselors there is safety and victory (Proverbs 11:14 & 24:5-6). The Lord himself is our great Counselor. In addition to his word and the work of his Spirit within us, he uses people to aid us in making wise decisions. There are at least two ways in which the “abundance of counselors” principle should be applied in our lives:

Seek counsel from many people for one particular decision. This is perhaps the most obvious application of the principle.

When we have a particular decision to make, perhaps we are considering a job offer, we go and get counsel from a number of friends and mentors to aid us.

One potential abuse of inquiring of many advisers for a decision is seeking counsel from different people until we find someone who agrees with our preconceived desire. A second potential abuse is asking too many people for help for the sake of tallying their votes and failing to take responsibility before God for making a timely and conclusive decision.

Keep many friends who are wise in particular aspects of life. Know which one or two to go to depending on the particular challenge we face. This is perhaps a less obvious application […]

3GT Episode 52: Food Fads & Diabolical Diets

Kyle the husband was served white rice and he wants to know why. Aaron the science teacher rants about scientific food studies. Barry the absent-minded struggles to remember videos and movies. It’s a red meat episode as the guys tackle those who associate gluten (and the lack thereof) with godliness!

In this age where the church potluck comes with dozens of warning signs, what’s a believer to do? Tune into this rollicking conversation as the guys discuss how “food will not commend us to God.”

https://threeguystheologizing.files.wordpress.com/2017/08/3gt-episode-52.mp3

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Notes:

Time Traveling Dietician Video

Temple Grandin

God is all you need

Introduction

This morning as we speak the Caribbean territories and the ‘pan-handle’ state is caught in the grip of a hurricane, which, if predictions are correct, will result in dire need. Back here, in case you are not aware, on the western seaboard of the Atlantic, many public figures have criticized the lethargic, sluggish, response of the UK government – while the French and Dutch had troops positioned in advance to deal with the looming crisis, the ministers in Whitehall were sitting on their hands (at least that is the charge), while their overseas territories of Anguilla, the British Virgin Islands and the Turks and Caicos Islands, were left in the eye of the storm, for Irma to do its worst.

Context

Paul writes to the Philippians from prison, with the potential of facing death row, to issue a promise that God would supply all their need. Just like any church or group of Christians, the needs of these believers were great. In addition to the normal round of problems that all of God’s children face, Paul catalogued a long list of urgent needs for both Himself and Christ’s flock, for which He was responsible.

Philippian & Pauline Needs

The recipients of the letter of […]

Browse Worthy: The Nashville Statement

Nashville Statement | Council for Biblical Manhood and Womanhood

The Council for Biblical Manhood and Womanhood issued a declaration consisting of fourteen articles addressing the gender and marriage issues of our day. Called the Nashville Statement, it was originally signed by a group of influential evangelical and Reformed men and women. You may have seen that it is receiving a great deal of attention.  Here are some interesting perspectives as you consider not only what it says, but its tone, purpose, and effectiveness.

Rosaria Butterfield | Why I Signed the Nashville Statement

The author of The Secret Thoughts of an Unlikely Convert explains why she believed it was important that she sign this document. She highlights the need for the church to continue to speak prophetically in our age.

Al Mohler | I signed the Nashville Statement. It’s an expression of love for same-sex attracted people.

The president of Southern Baptist Seminary explains the intent of the document is to offer clarity in an age of confusion. With counter declarations like the Denver Statement already being made, Mohler reminds the church of the cultural divide it faces and urges it to rally around Biblical truth.

Rod Dreher | Is the Nashville Statement a Surrender?

The promoter of the Benedict Option, Dreher […]

Romans 16, A Model of Encouragement

Everyone loves to be encouraged and praised and valued. We all know instinctively that “Anxiety in a man’s heart weighs him down, but a good work makes him glad.” (Pro. 12:25) Yet many of us struggle to build habits of regularly encouraging others. Perhaps many are worried that too much praise and honor will result in big-headed pride, so the best thing to do might be to keep our compliments to ourselves. Certainly complimenting and praising aren’t the only ways to encourage others (Scripture often shows us how to encourage with good and hopeful theology), but they should be tools we use often for the good of others.

Paul’s example in Romans 16 has always stood out as a great way to show honor and pay compliments in a way that continues to glorify God even while lifting up his servants. Here are just a few observations from the “farewell” chapter in Romans to get us started on showing others how much we value them.

3GT Episode 51: Heretic! Heretic!

From a question that arose during family worship, the prof turns the pastor and parishioner’s attention to II Peter 2 and asks how to identify a heretic. For it is a term that is often used wrongly (Luther was called one!) but should not be thrown around lightly. The parishioner immediately zooms in on the Trinity, and the pastor makes a distinction between heresy and a heretic. The guys focus on other key doctrines that, if done wrongly, constitute heresy. From there they highlight when a person should be deemed a false prophet. Then they even name some names as they point to a few of our modern day heretics!

You will want to take a listen and learn with the 3GTers how to sniff out a heretic!

https://threeguystheologizing.files.wordpress.com/2017/08/3gt-episode-51.mp3

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Like Scarecrows in Cucumber Fields

That’s how Jeremiah mocked the idols of his day. After describing the vanity of people constructing gods from wood, silver, and gold, then setting them up and fastening them so they would not totter, the prophet says:

Their idols are like scarecrows in a cucumber field, and they cannot speak; they have to be carried, for they cannot walk” (Jer. 10:5).

In ridiculing idols by picturing them to be like the scarecrows people set up to protect their crops, we can easily laugh along. And when Westerners look across oceans into places like Asia and Africa, and see people bowing down before such physical idols, the shaking of heads and the incredulous smiles remain. We think we would never be so foolish.

Yet the production of idolatry starts, as Calvin so famously pictured, in the factory of the heart. Everyone is prone to them and prostrates before them. For having a blind, obsessive devotion to any created thing is idolatry. Longing for any object, position, or relationship that is not rightfully your own is idolatry, as the Apostle Paul reminds us in two of his letters (Col. 3:5; Eph. 5;5). If that is indeed the case – and it is – then we in the West are propping […]