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3GT Episode 39: The Lord’s Presence in His Supper

Aaron wants to know. He quotes from the Westminster Confession of Faith and (after being warned about trespassing on Kyle’s other podcast) asks, “How is Christ present in communion?” After defining the four different views and giving Aaron an A on his test of them, a vigorous discussion on Christ’s human nature ensues. Where is his physical body now? How do we “eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood” as Jesus said in John 6:53? How do we “really and indeed” feed upon him as the Confession says? The guys chew upon this perplexing mystery, and offer up a slice of the Reformed answer to it!

https://threeguystheologizing.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/3gt-episode-39.mp3

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References Cited

Keith Mathison, Given for You: Reclaiming Calvin’s Doctrine of the Lord’s Supper

Peter Martyr Vermigli, The Oxford Treatise and Disputation

Martin Chemnitz, The Two Natures in Christ

Thomas Houston, The Lord’s Supper: Its Nature, Ends, and Obligations

John Calvin, Institutes of the Christian Religion 

Is it Possible that God is Actually a Terrible Demon Tricking Us?

Or it is at all possible that we are living in the Matrix?  Or are a brain in a vat?  Be honest!  Is it at all possible?

In this second video (do watch the first if you missed it), I tackle this thorny problem.  Having wrestled with this subject for well over a decade, I do not approach this as a dispassionate Christian.  There are profound implications hiding behind this issue.  So put on your thinking cap and dive on in.

 

 

 

 

Theology in View: The “What If” Problem (Part One)

Are we currently living in something like The Matrix? Can we know? And if not, then doesn’t agnosticism eat away at certainty?

In this first video, the problem of all-consuming agnosticism is set up, leaving us wondering if knowledge is forever crushed under the weight of ignorance.

If you find these helpful and enjoyable, please share with your friends.  In order to reach everyone who likes Gentle Reformation, Facebook charges fees in order to boost posts.  But if you share it, that helps circumvent it 🙂

 

Speaking of the Spirit

Reformed Christians are often accused, perhaps rightly so, of not emphasizing the person and work of the Holy Spirit sufficiently enough. As the Father has sent Jesus as our God-man mediator, from worship to evangelism our focus is to call people to come to the Father through the Son. We speak of being Christ-centered in our worship and preaching, as we should.  Yet often we can slip into “binitarian” tendencies instead of practicing a robust Trinitarian faith by not recognizing fully enough our dependency on the Spirit of God. Simply put, we fail to speak of the Spirit like we ought.

J.I. Packer has done a great deal to help us in the Reformed faith honor the Spirit’s role, most notably from his book on the third person of the Trinity entitled Keeping in Step with the Spirit: Finding Fullness in Our Walk with God. However, note how his familiar “hidden floodlight” illustration could be easily misunderstood if taken out of context.

I remember walking to a church one winter evening to preach on the words ‘he shall glorify me,’ seeing the building floodlit as I turned the corner, and realizing that this was exactly the illustration my ministry needed. When flood-lighting is […]

Hezekiah My Hero

I’ve just finished reading through 1 & 2 Kings, in Hebrew, last Friday. For the sins of King Manasseh, the nation of Judah was finally thrust out into the judgment of Exile to Babylon.

Hezekianic Analysis

Some weeks ago I did a blog entitled ‘Humbling Hezekiahs’. I had been reminded at that time about the danger of pride in leaders, particularly after times of successes. Re-reading the life and times of Hezekiah has given me a fresh more positive take on his reign – I’ve recently declared in church ‘Hezekiah is my new hero!’

Hezekianic Text

The bit of the text by which I was struck like a thunderbolt was 2 Kings 18.3:

“And he did what was right in the eyes of the LORD, according to all that David, his father, had done. He removed the high places and broke down the pillars and cut down the Asherah. And he broke in pieces the bronze serpent that Moses had made, for until those days the people of Israel had made offerings to it (it was called Nehushtan).”

There is far more to Hezekiah than initially meets the gaze. His reign concluded in a downfall caused by pride, when self-interest finally trumped and eclipsed a career […]

Introducing “Theology in View.” A New Video Blog By Yours Truly

So here we go.

I’m beginning a new project, one that involves much scribbling and theology.  Yes.  That’s right.  A video blog designed to communicate theology in a short, fresh, generally tasty, and slightly humorous fashion.

I have many topics I would like to cover, but as you can imagine, the process of coordinating voice to drawings is, well, not terribly easy.  So I hope to kick these out a couple times a month.  But no promises.  Some will be more theologically advanced (like the one here).  And some will be more elementary.  I will probably call them “Theology for Noobs.”

Naturally, I would covet any help you might toss my way, such as sharing the video on Facebook (or subscribing on YouTube).  To the degree that people find these enjoyable and helpful, to that same degree I will feel compelled to draw little Reformed stick men!

 

 

The Shoddiness of The Shack

With all the attention given to the movie The Shack, it would be good to take a careful look at the book it is based upon. The author, William P. Young, wrote The Shack: Where Tragedy Confronts Eternity (Newbury Park, Calif.: Windblown Media) in 2007. Below is review of the book by Dr. Michael LeFebvre, pastor of Christ Church Reformed Presbyterian in Brownsburg, Indiana, and author of Singing the Songs of Jesus: Revisiting the Psalms and Exploring Ecclesiastes: Joy That Perseveres.

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The Shack is a modern day allegory of the Christian life. Like John Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress, William Young’s The Shack is a vivid tale designed to teach the reader about the way of salvation. But Young’s vision, while helpful in points, ultimately presents a different kind of salvation than that of Bunyan’s classic.

Bunyan’s pilgrim labors under the burden called “sin,” and he only finds freedom from its guilt by receiving forgiveness at the cross. Young’s protagonist is cast in a more postmodern image. The Shack’s central character is Mackenzie Phillips, whose struggle is not with sin and guilt; Mack’s burden is “the great sadness”—the accumulated emotional baggage from his abusive childhood and the death of his daughter. Rather than seeking his own forgiveness, Mack’s […]